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Hello Tech Pros, What Products & Businesses Are You Building?

Hello Tech Pros is a podcast that explores the opportunities, challenges and anxieties that technical professionals and techpreneurs face when building their career, building their products and building their business. This show is about the people behind technology and the mindsets and skill sets they developed that led to their success. The show's host, Chad Bostick, is a 20 year veteran of the software development industry both as a practitioner and as a manager at companies like iBEAM Broadcasting, Devon Energy, Zynga and Fanduel. Chad is also an advocate for the awareness of Social Anxiety Disorder in the tech industry. His own battle in overcoming social anxieties led him to get the girl, lead the teams and launch a very successful podcast where he has interviewed over 250 guests.
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Sep 19, 2016

Jason Burt owns Evolve Holdings LLC and has over 20 years of leadership and cultural change experience based on learnings from working with Toyota (TPS/Lean).  Jason has worked in many industries and has been able to use his learning to help guide many companies to increased profitability through implementation of the Toyota philosophies.  Jason has worked in hundreds of companies and industries ranging from Aerospace (Metal Fabricators) to Commercial Farming (Farm & Distribution).

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/jason-burt-motivation/

Key Takeaways

  • Breaking up with a business partner is a lot like breaking up with a spouse.
    • The emotions are high, the assets get split and you need to talk to a lawyer.
    • You need to make a decision on what to do next. Do you carry on with the business, start it over or get a job somewhere else?
  • If you decide to move forward with the current business, you need to re-evaluate the priorities.
    • Reach out to existing clients and let them know what is going on. Take care of their needs.
    • Start hustling for new clients and ensure the revenue can quickly grow back to a sustainable level.
  • Even if selling is not comfortable for you, you can accomplish anything when you are backed into a corner.
  • Once you are taking action and being productive then you'll be more able to calm down and adjust to the new conditions.
  • The greatest demotivator to employees inside a struggling company is not knowing what is happening and how it will affect their jobs.
  • Be true to yourself.

 

 

Resources Mentioned

Sponsors

Sep 18, 2016

Building a D&D campaign is a lot like writing a series of books. First you have to start with the overall series goals before you dive into the details. In this episode we come up with a new campaign story that will play out like a 5 act play or 5 book series.

This is Part 4 of a multi-part podcast series.

Part 1: 10 Business Lessons Learned in Roleplaying Games

Part 2: Interview Players for Your D&D Campaign by Playing Board Games

Part 3: Picking a Genre and System for your RPG

This episode show notes: http://hellotechpros.com/dnd-campaign-design-unplugged/

Key Takeaways

  • Feel free to steal ideas
  • Snowflake method
  • Campaign Hook, one sentence
    • elevator pitch to sell players
    • location, goal, obstacles
    • "Several primitive and diverse tribes have assembled their leaders and heros to determine how to pacify the primordial spirits which have been devastating the area."
  • Campaign Hook, one paragraph
    • "Across the all lands where the springs and tributaries feed into the mighty Nelgenzes River, the primordial spirits are angry. Earthquakes, blizzards, tornadoes, floods and wildfires which were once rare are now more common and deadlier than ever. Crops have been destroyed, herds of animals scattered and killed and entire communities have been wiped out. The primitive and diverse tribes that populate the region have assembled their tribal elders, warchiefs, shamans and scouts to determine how to pacify the spirits of earth, fire, air and water from their frequent episodes of wanton destruction."
  • Big Picture Summary (secret)
    • Here + There + Resolve
    • Us + Them + Resolve
    • Secret 1 + Secret 2 + Secret 3
    • 4 disasters/dilemas + ending
  • 5 Parts of the overall story.
    • Part 1: The tribes nominate their champions who must figure out how to work together to discover leads, track down information, survive the brutality of elementals and protect their people from nature and each other. Cooperation.
    • Part 2: Resolution to learn about areas beyond Nelgenzes. Is everywhere affected? Can we relocate? Exploration.
    • Part 3: The heroes discover an advanced civilization in a far away land which is very different than Nelgenzes. Rich in magic, manufacturing and longevity, their metropolises are a wonder to behold and feel extremely alien. The people are very homogenous. Reflection and Adaptation.
    • Part 4: We learn that the overuse of magic and natural resources to try to control the environment and life expectancy of this civilization has created an imbalance in nature which is resulting in the devastation in the Nelgenzes Valley.
    • Part 5: The heroes must decide on a course of action. Should they destroy or limit magic which will adversly affect the metropolis? Should they migrate and integrate their tribes into this society and learn to master the magical arts? Is there another way to restore the natural order? Resolution.

Resources Mentioned

 

Sponsors

Sep 17, 2016

Simona Pop is a shareholder and head of partnerships & communication for a SaaS startup, InstaSupply. The company operates in the finance and procurement areas of B2B with the focus of changing the way we work through digitization and the removal of redundant manual processes. Simona's goal is to bring B2B in line with B2C across technology and communication. Way too many people go to work and have to leave the efficiencies they know and love in their personal lives at the office door. It's currently like 1999 but without Prince or a party!

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/simona-pop-entrepreneurship/

Key Takeaways

  • Why are we leading dual lives of super techies in personal life and then vintage tech at work?
  • The core idea of entrepreneurship is "Let's make things better."
  • To remain competitve, businesses need to adapt.
    • There is no way to maintain the King of the Jungle status without changing.
  • Enterprise software feels like something frozen in time. The user experiences are not keeping up with what consumers demand.
    • Implementing new technology in the past was more of a Frankenstein effort of independent solutions and not a holistic solution where everything communicates together.
    • Users are logging in and out of 10 different solutions for 8 different tasks.
    • Administrators are spending all day Monday through Wednesday just doing the repetitive tasks.
  • Finance and operations are slow to change processes.
  • Millennials in the workplace accelerates the adoption of modern technology.
  • We need to have a transition tech in the workplace to bridge the gap between millennials and the X Gen and Baby Boomers.
  • We still have a great abundance of paper and spend time, money and resources driving trucks around delivering paper.
  • The network effect of Purchase to Pay is bringing together buyers and suppliers.
  • Think about working smarter and how that will affect your future plans.
Sep 16, 2016

Andy Haskell is a web software engineer at Meta Search in Cambridge, which is like a Google search for your files. Andy also runs the blog Computer Science for the Slothful and is one of the organizers of Boston Golang. When he's not coding, you can find Andy running or gaming. Don't ask Andy Haskell about sloths or Pokemon unless you want to have a 45-minute conversation!

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/andy-haskell-people/

Key Takeaways

  • It's hard to get a job without work experience and to get work experience without a job.
  • Volunteer and look for internships.
  • Are you using the same college exam questions for your interview questions or are you digging deeper?
  • The interviewee should be doing interview themselves. The company is looking for the perfect candidate and the candidate is looking for the perfect company.
  • Show personality and thought process in the interview.
Sep 15, 2016

Stephen Gatchell is currently a Chief Data Officer Engineering Analytics & Data Lake at EMC and serves on the EMC Data Governance Office, Master Data Management and Business Data Lake Operating committee’s developing EMC’s corporate strategies for the Business Data Lake, Advanced Analytics and Information Asset Management.  Stephen also serves as a Customer Insight Analyst for the Chief Technology Office analyzing customer technology challenges and requirements.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/stephen-gatchell-technology/

Key Takeaways

  • A data lake is a way to democratize data. It can be structure, unstructured or semi-structured including all of the data assets including visualizations, tables and views.
  • The idea of a data lake is to break down the silos between the departments and come up with innovative solutions across a variety of different sources. The use cases are very important.
  • Historically, "big data" was 1 GB and all of it was managed by IT.
    • The data would be imported into a BI system in order to analyze.
    • There was no drill down into the raw data from a report.
  • Today data analysts are at all levels of the organization in all departments.
    • HR, legal, engineering, interns and VPs are all analysts.
    • Now we need real-time data with access across the organization.
    • The people, process and technology have all progressed over the last few decades.
      • People who want to drill down to get to the results.
      • Process to get the analytics updated in real time.
      • Open source technology allows anyone to build their own database.
  • A data scientist is a subject matter expert (SME) that understands the data and also can code.
    • They don't need to have a mathematical background but they are studying statistics and want to generate a D3 visualization.
  • Rogue IT is a good thing (as long as they aren't a security risk). We want the business to understand technology.
  • IT needs to keep the lights on and support the business in finding new tech.
    • IT needs to look for end-to-end solutions that help many groups across the org.
    • Data lake, visualization, ingestion tools for example.
  • The next things in Big Data are data governance, MDM and data quality.
    • What is the value of this data to our business?
    • Natural Language Query (NLQ) will enable a no-UI analytics engine.
    • Flash storage will allow petabytes to be searched very quickly.
  • Always learn, build connections and be as persistent as possible.
Sep 14, 2016

Eric Fisher is the .NET Content Author for Code School. He also has over 10 years of experience as a software developer.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/eric-fisher-leadership/

Key Takeaways

  • Are you recognizing the extra effort and overtime that your salaried employees are putting in, or are you just docking them for taking time off?
  • From a Total Cost of Ownership perspective, it's important to track time on projects and support, but not to belittle good employees.
  • Problem solvers and digital workers tend to put in extra work when they are "in the zone." It doesn't make sense to start something deep and involved when there is only 15 minutes left in the day.
  • The team members who speak up and challenge the status quo tend to grow into the spokesperson or team lead for the group.
  • Some companies make you feel like your individual voice doesn't matter.
  • Soft deadlines can be moved, hard deadlines have dire consequenses. Be upfront and communicate the expectations clearly to everyone involved.
  • If you need more people, resource or time, find more people, resource or time. Don't put your employees under undue stress for no reason.
  • Some people do not like conflict and find it difficult to speak up for themselves. We have to look out for everyone, not just those who are more vocal.
  • To get a group to buy into a new idea, discuss it with individuals one-on-one before the group meeting. Get their ideas and concerns out in the open in a non-threatening environment.
  • Bring up your concerns and escalate appropriately with upper management.
  • The employees are going to treat the company the same way the company treats the employees.
Sep 13, 2016

Jay Miller is a System Administrator, Pastor, Developer, and Podcaster.  Jay started the Productivity in Tech Community hoping to help people in the tech industry find ways to be more productive. He's also host the Productivity in Tech Podcast.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/jay-miller-productivity/

Key Takeaways

  • In the military and some large command-and-control companies, you're just supposed to do what you're told.
    • In small business, you don't know exactly what you're supposed to be doing and how to prioritize.
  • Prioritize your day using the Eisenhower matrix.
    • Is this going to break today? (Urgency)
    • Is this going to break soon and get me fired? (Importance)
    • Instead of working on all the little unimportant / non-urgent things and not get anything done, get prioritized.
  • Not everyone's priorities are in alignment.
    • Their fire may be like a struck match and yours is like a building on fire.
    • Have a conversation about the combined priorities and let everyone know what they are.
  • Your heath, personal goals and dreams are never someone else's priority. You need to focus on prioritize time for yourself.
  • A good system is something you don't have to worry about. It just works.
  • If you yes to everyone and everything, you're not allowing people to develop their own productivity systems.
  • Delegate repetitive tasks and focus on higher-level priorities.
  • Get in the zone and enjoy what you're doing.
  • Make sure you're focusing on being productive, not being busy.
  • Focus on the one thing that is the most important today. Don't spend too much time worrying about the future.
  • You are already productive, now start optimizing.
Sep 12, 2016

Andreas Jones is the Founder of Combat Business Coaching, #1 Bestselling author of Business Leader Combat, marketing strategist, business growth expert,contributor at The Huffington Post and army combat veteran. Andreas works with small and medium-sized companies and help them build meaningful businesses so that they can have more profit, fans and freedom.

Who notes at http://hellotechpros.com/andreas-jones-motivation/

Key Takeaways

  • You can't do anything meaningful all by yourself. Put a team in place.
  • When you aren't seeing results, it's easy to beating up and questioning yourself.
  • Search for the perfect mentor who can help you through the difficulties.
  • Success is not convenient and opportunity knocks at inopportune times.
  • Don't use unfortunate situations as an excuse to limit your dreams.
  • If you say yes to your dreams, you have to say yes 1000 times. The first yes is the first step.
  • When you're struggling with imposter syndrome, push through the mental struggles every day.
  • Speed to market is critical.
  • Understand what your clients are looking for and streamline your services to meet their needs.

 

Resources Mentioned

 

Sep 11, 2016

After finding the right group of friends to play a role playing game, it's time to select the genre and system. So. Many. Options.

This is part 3 of a multi-part series.

Part 1
Part 2

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/rpg-genre-system-unplugged/

RPG Genres

  • High fantasy - lots of magic.
  • Low fantasy - little to low magic.
  • Modern action / adventure.
  • Historical action.
  • Horror.
  • Sci-Fi.
  • Super Heros.

 

Resources Mentioned

Sep 10, 2016

Dave Chesson is the author behind Kindlepreneur.com, a site devoted to teaching authors advanced books sales tactics and strategies. Dave's helped authors all over the world increase their sales and does it freely.  Just recently him and his team created KDP Rocket, a software that gives authors key marketing data to ensure their book will succeed on Amazon before they even write it.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/dave-chesson-entrepreneurship/

Key Takeaways

  • You don't have to be a naturally good writer to write and sell books.
  • Fail forward. It's the challenge and overcoming the failure that's fun.
  • Niche websites are doing well at 10k hits a month.
  • Amazon is a search engine.
    • Keyword research and SEO is equally important in Amazon as it is for Google.
    • You need to prove to Amazon that you will make them more money than your competitors.
    • Amazon rankings are influenced by traffic volume, number of purchases and great reviews.
  • Do the research and see if your book going to be successful before you write it.
    • Type in your idea, search and look for books to show up. Are they selling? Are there reviews?
    • If no one is buying, you may not want to get into that market.
    • Amazon Best Seller Rank ranges from 1 to 4.7 million. Type this number into the Amazon Sales Rank Calculator tells you how sales are being generated.
  • Can you beat the competition on the market?
    • Your competitive advantage may be  a better book cover, a more engaging title or better SEO.
  • Develop a skill. Having one thing you're an expert at is more effective than being a jack of all trades.
Sep 9, 2016
Alysse Metzler’s career evolved to not only finding the best talent in the industry but also helping America get back to work. Her life’s mission is to help people of all ages and backgrounds find their dream job. She’s taken all of the lessons she’s learned in her 12 years of recruiting and wrote, The Recruiting Snitch, Recruiting Secrets to Help Land Your Dream Job. Alysse believes by understanding what a recruiter thinks, an applicant can achieve better results from their interviews and their job search.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/alysse-metzler-people/

Key Takeaways

  • While most people are in their current job, they don't think about brand or networking.
  • When you're working, that's the best time to make connections and get to know people when you don't need but but genuinely want to get to know them.
  • You have to know people to find the positions that aren't publically posted.
  • Being shy is not an excuse, you are losing a lot of opportunities.
  • There is no such thing as a permanent job. Every company in every industry has some level of volatility.
  • Keep your LinkedIn profile updated at least yearly.
  • It's not about "collecting" people into your social network, it's about connecting with them as people.
  • At a networking event, try to make one solid new relationship.
  • People want to know "how can this person help me?"
  • It's not about what people can do for you, it's about what you can do for others.
  • Your personal brand is not just your skill set or your presence on social media. It's about building a reputation and being a subject matter expert. It's how people perceive you.
  • Good candidates are connected. They are looking at new tech, going to meetup groups and being part of the community.
  • There are two kinds of job candidates.
    • Active candidates are actively looking for a job. They need a new job right away and have less negotiating power. The longer you are unemployed, the less negotiating power you have.
    • Passive candidates are happily employed and have a powerful personal brand. Recruiters are knocking at their door and making great offers to entice them.
  • The best time to look for a job is when you have a job.
  •  You should be having career conversations with your manager annually during performance reviews.
    • An engineer generally bumps up in job title every 2 years.
    • The director-to-VP track will be longer, in the timeframe of 5-8 years.
    • Proactively have the conversation with your manager if they aren't bringing it up.
  • Closed mouths dont get fed.
  • Network, network, network. Connect with people and get out of your comfort zone.
Sep 8, 2016

TradeLive, a recently launched Austin-based startup, is a modern business-to-business marketplace for new and used IT gear aimed at eliminating the pitfalls that make other IT exchanges slow, unreliable and restrictive.

General manager Doug Wick is building this company, after having spent 15 years in senior product/business development roles at software startups.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/doug-wick-technology/

Key Takeaways

  • The secondary market for IT gear is starting to mature like the used car market.
  • 15 years ago, your only real solution was to find some guy online and sell him a trunk full of stuff. This was ok for small businesses, but not practical for enterprise.
  • In asset disposition, most of it goes to recycling.
  • Cars and computers drop value quickly, though there are still some hardware that is usable and valuable for smaller businesses.
  • Due to Moore's Law, the progress on hardware outpaces the software.
  • The lifetime of hardware is useful for 15 years now.
  • Instead of buying a new router with new options and configurations you can now get the same model off the secondary market.
  • Valuing IT equipment is like valuing art.
  • Tradelive is like CarMax for IT gear.
    • All the inventory is priced at the best price, and is driving the change for the industry.
    • This network of dealerships operates via price transparency and market efficiency.
  • We are now in a position to allow developing countries have access to this equipment.
  • The secondary IT market has been valued in $100s billions.
  • The Austin tech scene works on non-sexy problems.
Sep 7, 2016

Patrick Kua is a Technical Principal Consultant for ThoughtWorks in London. He is a conference speaker and author of "The Retrospective Handbook" and "Talking with Tech Leads" and is passionate about bringing a balanced focus on people, organization and technology.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/patrick-kua-leadership/

Key Takeaways

  • Horrible bosses don't have to be managers, they can be more senior people on the team.
  • Personal issues should be taken offline, after calming down.
  • If you are a junior colleague trying to resolve an issue with a more senior colleague, find another senior individual to act as a mediator.
  • Developer to tech lead is a huge jump and changes the expectations.
    • When you are a dev your workload consists of code, working with fellow devs and solving tech problems.
    • When you are a team lead your workload consists of people issues, planning and whole system architecture.
  • When moving to a tech lead role, it can feel lonely.
    • Your focus is on the broader view, not tech issues.
    • You're not working on the same issues with your old friends.
    • You're starting to spend more time in meetings with people outside the department.
  • However, you have a broader impact on the organization.
    • You set the culture.
    • Instead of having really deep relationships with a small group of people that you pair with every day, you need to invest time with the broader team.
    • You must get outside of your comfort zone and spend time with people with different styles.
  • Your emotional range and capacity to connect with people will grow as your career grows.
Sep 6, 2016

Spencer Liu comes with a 20-year track record in marketing, Internet product strategy, and business development. He's worked with companies such as Sony Computer Entertainment, EA Sports, Sega, and CNET Networks before becoming a serial entrepreneur. He was a founding member of HighGear Media (acquired by Internet Brands, a network of lifestyle-focused car shopping websites) and founded his own consulting company GoSunday later working with many European startups such as Experteer, Qype, and GOOM Radio to fine tune their product strategies and optimizing user experiences.

In late 2011, Spencer positioned himself in the middle of the China mobile gaming industry and was a founding member of Yodo1 Games, a mobile games publishing platform focusing on bringing great western content into the difficult-to-figure-out China gaming market. While solving different business problems which mobile developers and publishers face everyday, Spencer was inspired to simultaneously kick off KTplay, the world’s only in-game player community and live ops platform.

Show notes at 

Key Takeaways

  • Try new things you don't know anything about. Putting yourself outside of your comfort zone makes you work harder to be productive.
  • In uncomfortable situations you have to rely on others and build teams.
  • In some cultures, the big boss is the big boss. The boss never asks, just commands.
  • Take the team out to lunch and establish rapport and promise them they won't get fired for speaking up.
  • People can get unmotivated because they are busy working on 10 things but don't know the priorities.
  • When discouraged, focus outside of yourself.
  • Develop and continually revisit the vision statement. Are yourselves these questions:
    • Who do we want to be and what do we want to do for whom?
    • What was original vision for the company?
    • Are these customers the right partners for the platform?
    • Are we chasing after numbers instead of results?
    • Are the customers using the platform the way we intented them to do?
    • If we continue to duplicate this partnership, what will the product look like 6 month from now?
  • Look at the situation from different perspectives.
Sep 5, 2016

Ben Bostic is an experienced, cross-industry Software Executive & Product Architect. Survivor. Artist. Life is my favorite medium. Every day is a blank page. Wanderlustful.

Ben was one of 155 survivors on the US Airways Flight 1549 from NY La Guardia Airport to Charlotte Douglas International which experienced an emergency water landing in the Hudson River on January 15, 2009.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/ben-bostic-motivation/

 

Key Takeaways

  • Life changing events can lead to reflecting on life goals.
  • In survival-mode, your mind filters out things that aren't helpful.
  • When was the last time you looked at the safety card in the back of the seat on a flight?
  • In a life-threatening situation, your mind can flux back and forth between peace and anxiety.
  • Move forward to the nearest exit in front of you, rather than moving backwards down the aisle.
  • If all your worldly possessions are sinking to the bottom of a river, do you really care?
  • Survivor's guilt can affect everyone involved. It's questioning whether or not you could have or should have done anything different.
  • Try to live in the now. Don't worry about the past or regrets.
  • Have goals and dreams. Focus on building stronger relationships. Get rid of negativity and surround yourself with more positive people.
  • When life flashes before your eyes, will you regret the things you have yet to do?
  • The move "Sully" premieres September 9, 2009.

 

Resources Mentioned

Sep 4, 2016

So you want to start a roleplaying game? First, you need to find a group. Test out combinations of players by playing board games before starting a campaign.

This is part 1 in a multi-part series.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/rpg-starter-unplugged/

Other Podcast Episodes

 

Games

Sep 3, 2016

Kelly Roach is the host of the top rated podcast Unstoppable Success Radio, an International best-selling author, and the CEO of Kelly Roach Coaching.

As a former NFL Cheerleader and Fortune 500 Executive where she was promoted 7 times in 8 years, Kelly brings a powerful combination of proven and profitable business growth strategies coupled with the mindset, wellness and productivity practices required to help entrepreneurs build a profitable business around a life they absolutely love.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/kelly-roach-entrepreneurs/

Key Takeaways

  • Entrepreneurship is about fulfillment, purpose and impact and earning an income that allows freedom and financial abundance.
  • You wont have the persistence and hustle unless it aligns with your purpose.
  • Don't feel bad about working full time and working on the side hustle.
  • Most people start and stop several businesses before they land on one.
  • Don't force it just because you want it.
  • What do you want life to look like 5-10-15 years from now?
  • We are all put on the planet to make an impact and all have talent, dreams. You were given these things for a reason.
  • The average person is only productive 3 hours a day.  Carve out 1 hour morning, lunch and 1 hour each night.
  • Working on the side makes you extremely focused.
  • There is a difference between productivity and buziness. Learn better time management.
  • Almost no entrepreneurs spend an hour a day in prospecting new clients.
  • Being productive is not about getting more done, it's about being aligned with the outcomes and results you want.
  • Write down all the things in your business you spend time on and circle the things that pay money. How many of all the things did you circle? Probably not enough.
  • You should only work on generating leads and closing them.
  • Automate, delegate, outsource and delete.
  • Content is not king. Millions of people are cranking out content and not making money.
  • Conversions is king. Start with the call to action.
  • If you are making under under $50k, your key actions should be:
    • The first primary goal and call to action is to get them onto the email list or community you own.
    • The next step is free training. For example, 5 tips on the content then provide deep dive training via email.
    • Provide deep dive consultations over the phone. Aim for at least 3 paid clients a week, coaching and speaking.
  • Don't set your pricing based on your competition. Set your pricing based on the impact that you will have on their business and life.
  • First get people to pay for your time, then productize your experience.
  • Keep it simple.

 

Sep 2, 2016

Monica Neubauer is a successful REALTOR in Franklin, TN and has been a National Speaker in the industry since 2009.  As an Education Junkie, she enjoys talking about many aspects of Real Estate and Business.  As the 2015 REALTOR of the Year for her local association, she is active at home, but also enjoys traveling the 50 states and any country that will let her in.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/monica-neubauer-people/

Key Takeaways

  • The public is educating themselves about real estate which is a good thing, but they may be missing vital information.
  • The process of buying a house is much more complicated than what they show on HGTV.
  • Every real estate market is extremely localized.
  • Pros for working with a real estate agent:
    • They are in the local market every day.
    • The market  is extremely localized, 30 minutes away is very different.
    • Roads, schools, zoning constantly changing.
    • Agents are well-trained.
    • They keep up with regulatory changes.
    • Agents can help you understand the upgrades.
    • Agent has all the paperwork and help understand the process and educating the buyer or seller.
    • It is a stressful processand its nice to have someone to help balance the emotions.
  • Interview the real estate agent to determine if they keep up with continuing education.
    • Ask friends for referrals. Did they love their agent?
    • Have they been in the industry very long and what has their education been?
    • If new to the business, do they have a mentor?
    • What forms of technology are they using?
    • Are they using professional photography or an iPhone?
    • Which communication methods do they prefer?
    • Do they have a full time job and just hustling on the weekends?
    • How much business are they doing?
      • 15 transactions is a fulltime real estate job. 30 is amazing.
      • 100 transactions is a team - who is the agent that you're actually going to be working with?
    • What negotion skills do they have?
  • Be prepared to voice your expectations.

 

Sep 1, 2016

After a close-call with a hippopotamus while canoeing in Africa, Tim Barnes celebrated life with African artists and artisans by commissioning a custom, hand-crafted “hippo chair”. After 25 years of consulting and leading IT organizations, Tim decided to give back to a third-world community — but more than aid — by creating awareness and business opportunities via first-world marketing channels and old-school import/export legwork.

Tim Barnes has spent the last 20+ years in the Information Technology industry, half of which as a consultant for Deloitte and Accenture and half as Director of Information Delivery at Devon Energy. Tim has lived in both the US and Canada and enjoys backpacking around the world. Today he is the Founder at MoreThanAid.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/tim-barnes-technology/

 

Key Takeaways

  • More Than Aid is a cause that helps villages in Malawi, Africa help themselves by providing an international marketplace to sell Malawi artwork.
  • Malawi ranks 173rd out of 188 countries worldwide on the United Nations Human Development Index.
  • 20 pieces of art has been shipped and sold to US and Canadian art collectors which has provided resources for 3 kids to go to secondary school.
  • Over 50% of the population in Malawi are 15 years old and under. The adults time are focused on farming and food and water, not trying to create economic change.
  • In most aid situations, most of the money goes to the bigger cities, not the rural areas.
  • Tim used Excel to develop a pricing formula for the artwork.
    • How big is the picture, how many colors, how complex?
  • Facebook became THE platform for communication and coordination, both on the marketing side and the volunteers.
  • Accepting a Facebook friend from an impoverished country can be eye opening.
  • It's important to people in Canada and US what its like to be a native in impoverished countries.
  • People in developing countries think differently than privileged because of the challenges they've overcome.
    • They've learned how to survive.
    • They may inflate their situation to get noticed, which can lead to corruption.
Aug 31, 2016

Chris Surdak is an award winning author, futurist, technologist and former rocket scientist.  Chris writes about technology disruption and help companies navigate the accelerating changes around us.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/chris-surdak-leadership/ 

Key Takeaways

  • Set a longterm goal with meticulous planning, be flexible to change in the future, monitor along the way, and be open to frequent fast failure.
  • Don’t be afraid to be wrong or make a mistake.
  • Look at the bigger picture and outcomes that employees generate before nitpicking the operational metrics.
  • We need destructive, disruptive innovation, but it’s harder to implement than incremental change.
  • If you want to start innovating, you have to stop improving.
  • You can assume that your ability to improve your business is good.
    • Identify the exceptions and outliers and focus on improving them.
  • In what circumstances do you want your employees to make a judgment call and “break” the rules for the betterment of the organization?
  • We have transitioned through 2 trinities of power.
    • The Analog Trinity was about bureaucracy, process and rules. It was about growing capital.
    • The Digital Trinity now consists of mobility, social media and analytics. It is about growing information.
  • The millennial generation naturally understands the Digital Trinity but the Analog generations need to learn to adapt. Everything that we’ve done to be successful in our past careers is now “wrong.”
  • In an age of disruption, if you’re comfortable you’re getting something wrong. You have a 98% of getting it wrong and a 2% chance of getting it right.
Aug 30, 2016

Bill Kennedy is a managing partner at Ardan Studio in Miami, Florida, a mobile, web, and systems development company. He is also a co-author of the book Go in Action, the author of the blog GoingGo.Net, and a founding member of GoBridge which is working to increase Go adoption through diversity.

 

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/bill-kennedy-productivity/

Aug 29, 2016

Basel Farag is an iOS/Other Developer/Mentor/Tech Writer. He's been published in TechCrunch and the Simple Programmer and writes regularly on all things Swift/iOS and tech on his blog: garglingwithrazorblades.com. He regularly appears at iOS Development Conferences across the U.S. and the world, writes and speaks on topics surrounding Swift and Machine Learning/Scientific programming and is currently writing a book. Basel is the author behind the controversial "Please don't learn to code," and is vocal about the rights of marginalized communities in tech. He learned to code only a few years ago but he's achieved modest success regardless.

 

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/basel-farag-motivation/

Aug 28, 2016

I think I might have learned more about business while playing RPGs than I have from studying business. Here are my Top 10.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/rpg-business-lessons-unplugged/

Key Takeaways

  1. Confidence
  2. Leadership
  3. Facilitation
  4. Cooperation
  5. Negotiation
  6. Diversity
  7. Being a part of something bigger than ourselves
  8. Teamwork
  9. Sharing resources
  10. Overcoming adversity
Aug 27, 2016

Veronica Kirin is an anthropologist turned serial entrepreneur.  She loves working closely with clients to help them reach their goals.  Her first business, Green Cup Design, began as a freelance web design venture and has grown into digital maintenance for small businesses.

 

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/veronica-kirin-entrepreneurship/

Aug 26, 2016

Crucial conversations are defined by Kerry Patterson as a needed conversation that involves strong emotions, opposing opinions and high stakes. But what happens when you need to have a crucial conversation but suffer from social anxiety?

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/crucial-conversations-and-anxiety/

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