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Hello Tech Pros, What Products & Businesses Are You Building?

Hello Tech Pros is a podcast that explores the opportunities, challenges and anxieties that technical professionals and techpreneurs face when building their career, building their products and building their business. This show is about the people behind technology and the mindsets and skill sets they developed that led to their success. The show's host, Chad Bostick, is a 20 year veteran of the software development industry both as a practitioner and as a manager at companies like iBEAM Broadcasting, Devon Energy, Zynga and Fanduel. Chad is also an advocate for the awareness of Social Anxiety Disorder in the tech industry. His own battle in overcoming social anxieties led him to get the girl, lead the teams and launch a very successful podcast where he has interviewed over 250 guests.
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Now displaying: September, 2016
Sep 30, 2016

Paula Paul entered the workforce as a software engineer after an internship with IBM in the early 80’s. Since then she has shipped commercial software, evangelized .NET for Microsoft, and held executive positions in corporate IT. After ‘flipping the table’ mid-career, she came back to technology through a passion for teaching people to code. Paula is currently an architect with AmWINS Group, Inc. and enjoys work in the community as an ABI (Anita Borg Institute) Syster, diversity speaker, and mentor.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/paula-paul-people/

What you will learn from this episode

  • Why this is the perfect time to get into the technology industry.
  • The demographics of awesome software developers.
  • Why "TechnologyPeople" is an awesome glitch.
  • The hardest part of working in the tech industry and why we struggle in that area.
  • How to get around the passive-aggressive resistance of engineers.
  • The win-win scenario of being wrong.
  • Why we need to tap into the emotions of the people we are serving.
  • The fears and anxieties that hold people back.
  • How to find the companies that will support your skill set.

 

Sponsors

Sep 29, 2016

Brandy Semore has over fifteen years of management experience in various fields with a strong grounding in internet, data center operations and business management strategies. She graduated from Oklahoma State University with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and holds a MBA from Oklahoma City University, with an emphasis in project management and is PMP certified with the Project Management Institute.

Beyond being a working mom delicately balancing her career with her family – she is passionate in helping and serving others. Brandy is dedicated to coaching others in managing successful projects, regardless of one’s background or training, as seen from her blog articles Project Success: Six Factors. She is also an advocate for equal pay and equal opportunity for women working in technology. She serves as the volunteer President and Executive Director for Oklahoma Women in Technology (OKWIT), which she co-founded in March 2016. Since its inception, OKWIT has attained over 350 members and expanded from the OKC metro area into Tulsa. She is also the Director of Operations for Pinnacle Business System, a information technology solutions provider.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/brandy-semore-technology/

Key Takeaways

  • When you have women in leadership positions in technology, businesses see an increase in productivity and profit.
  • Sometimes men stop talking shop when women workers walk in the room.
  • Women built the first computer.
  • In the 1980s, women dropped out out of tech jobs and STEM degrees.
  • 35% of computing jobs filled by female workers in the U.S has dropped to 26% today.
  • Women as a whole have to be guarded about what they say about their careers to not damage the relationships with their male colleagues.
  • Many women in technology are introverts and don't like speaking out.
  • Groups like OKWIT are connecting women in a safe environment to talk about these issues.
    • Women are starting to feel empowered. They are asking for raises, asking for promotions and getting in leadership.
  • Women in technology starts at home as parents. Introduce girls to technology, Legos, telescopes, microscopes, Scratch camps.
  • High school admins need to introduce girls to tech opportunities and STEM activities.
  • Collegiate professors and administrators need to make females feel comfortable and welcome.
  • Don't say things to make a girl feel bad about herself for being interested in STEM.
  • When planning an offsite event, include activities that are more inclusive.
  • Men tend to ask for raises and promotions more while women wait. Managers need to be aware of this and look across the entire talent pool.

 

Resources Mentioned

Sep 28, 2016

Kevin Jean-Charles is the Founder of Transparency Financial Technology Corp which owns and operates Finslide brand, a personal cashflow technology that services families and individuals.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/kevin-jean-charles-leadership/

Key Takeaways

  • What is the #1 priority to your brand? Are you enabling your employees to be successful in that area?
  • Support your employees but don't be a "helicopter boss." No hovering.
  • Don't count the hours, count the moments and conversations.
    • Your life can change after one conversation. Make sure each conversation will have a positive impact on the people around you.
    • Make each day a masterpiece.
  • To engage an audience, whether it be with technology or conversation, you have to make it relevant to them.
    • Helping youth understand personal finance and cash flow means you need to engage them using the user interfaces that help them the best.
  • Think before you speak - you don't have to be an abusive boss.
Sep 27, 2016

Theo Priestley is the CEO of Cronycle, a content discovery and collaboration platform. Priestley has a wealth of experience in senior positions at software companies and advisory roles working with diverse startups such as Cupenya, and Novaquark (developing the E3 hit Dual Universe). Priestley is very active in the startup community mentoring within UK and US accelerators.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/theo-priestley-productivity/

Key Takeaways

  • Documentation for the sake of documentation is unproductive.
  • Kit bags are project and document templates to build on quickly instead of creating from scratch.
  • Find like-minded people who are willing to run with POCs and then proving it works.
  • Information is everywhere and we are poor at filtering the noise.
    • It feels like we are drowning in a content tsunami.
  • Groups tend to fall into the relevance paradox. They don't know to look for different types of information because of the lack of experience and knowledge. (You don't know what you don't know.)
  • Automation should be used to augment the filtering process, not replace it.
  • Who are the sources that are providing real, diverse value and who are just posting memes? Filter the memes.
  • If you have to create a new channel to replace the channel that is just filled with noise it is past time to implement a channel moderator or curator.
  • Some content is designed to be point-in-time just for that project and some will be evergreen.
  • Be more selective about content you consume.
Sep 26, 2016

Kindle Rashod is a motivational hip-hop artist targeting other creative artists and entrepreneurs. His brand involves more than just making music. Through blogging, writing books, podcasts, and videos, Kindle wants to provide information on motivation, productivity, innovation, and faith.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/kindle-rashod-motivation/

Key Takeaways

  • Most people don't have the mindset to be motivated and become successful.
  • Successful business leaders, motivational speakers and best-selling authors put a lot of emphasis on having the right mindset.
  • Unmotivation is a gradual thing. You can become comfortable at the level you're at and stop moving forward.
  • emphasis on attitude about the world
  • Prepare your mind and body for success.
  • You are the company you keep. If you hang around unmotivated people, you will be unmotivated.
  • Stop watching television to increase your productivity.
  • Medidate on images of goals. Print out pictures of black checks, money, pictures of audience.
  • Write a life plan (business plan for life). Describe what it is you want.
    • How do you want to be mentally? How do you want to grow your mind, education, think stronger or faster?
    • How do you want to be physically? Do you want to grow muscles or build strength?
  • Create a supportive environment.
  • Whatever your goals are, make it 10x.
Sep 25, 2016

Fleshing out the First Campaign Arc

This is Part 5 of a multi-part podcast series.

Part 1: 10 Business Lessons Learned in Roleplaying Games

Part 2: Interview Players for Your D&D Campaign by Playing Board Games

Part 3: Picking a Genre and System for your RPG

Part 4: Developing an Epic D&D Campaign Story

More info on this campaign.

 

Campaign Notes

  • All the notes for this campaign are for subscribers only. Use the signup box below.

 

Play this Campaign

Sep 24, 2016

Priest Willis, Sr is CEO of Affiliate Mission – the fastest growing affiliate management startup in North Carolina. Priest got his start in affiliate marketing in early 2000’s where he cut his teeth building a few niche affiliate sites and eventually started managing company programs like Lenovo, Atomicpark.com and BuyCostumes.com.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/priest-willis-entrpreneurship/

Key Takeaways

  • Affiliate marketing is not MLM, get rich quick scheme.
  • Amazon was first to put together affiliate programs.
  • Entrepreneurs are hungry.
  • Many millionaries have 7 streams of income.
  • Affiliate marketing is a pay-for-performance model with no inventory.
    • Little risk is involved because no inventory.
    • Build up an audience and be an influencer.
  • Subscription boxes are doing really well.
  • As a merchant, it's a cheap way to extend your marketing program.
  • Find a hot niche right now like Suicide Squad and then sell costumes.
    • Position yourself to look for the new hotness.
Sep 23, 2016

Bill Schmarzo is the CTO of EMC's Big Data Consulting Practice and a frequent industry speaker, a blogger, a professor at the University of San Francisco School of Management as well as an author. Schmarzo wrote "Big Data MBA: Driving Business Strategies with Data Science" and "Big Data: Understanding How Data Powers Big Business".

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/bill-schmarzo-people/

Key Takeaways

  • The companies who are successful with Big Data addressed the cultural or people issues.
    • How do we get people engaged in the process so that we're delivering the analytics in a way that is actionable to our stakeholders?
  • Many companies tend to start with implementing Hadoop and then waiting for magic to happen. It doesn't happen.
  • Data science is really identifying the variables and metrics that MIGHT be a better predictor of performance.
    • "Might" is a license to be wrong and in many companies the idea of wrong is bad.
  • In the BI space, the IT departments over promised and under deliveredwhich has lead business leaders to be skeptical of Big Data initiatives.
  • You have to have a tight alignment between the business and IT to ensure that we are working on the right problems.
  • Pick a topic / problem that business users find is important, focus on strategic business initiatives.
    • Create a link between business and data scientists.
  • Create a culture of creativity across the whole organization.
    • Creativity is a contagious event.
    • All ideas are worthy of consideration.
    • We want people to be unafraid to be creative and sharing their ideas even if they may not work.
    • The best ideas come from front line.
    • Most large organizations struggle with protecting their own fiefdoms which leads to data silos.
  • Big Data is not about big, its about small.
    • Learn as much as possible about individual person, event and situation instead of looking at the average of the data.
    • Aggregated data is the devil. You need to work with raw to serve the individual.
  • Big Data initiatives tend to fail because the teams are focused on too many opportunities instead of being focused and priortizing the most important business problems.
    • Focus on one decision which has high value and high feasibility.
  • Big Data is a team sport.
    • We need everyone involved, including the business, the IT and the data scientists.
    • Success breeds success. Quick wins will catch the attention of other people and build a grassroots movement.

 

Sep 22, 2016

Nick Rust has spent the majority of his professional career working in Healthcare IT (10 years), with a particular emphasis in Health Care and Medical Device information security.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/nick-rust-technology/

Key Takeaways

  • It's common that most people don't have experience in healthcare IT.
  • When medical devices first came out, it was an instrument, not a piece of information technology.
  • Radiology has more tech and devices than most other departments.
  • Biotech been around for decades, IT came in 1980s.
  • New biotech are computers integrated into the instruments.
    • The facilities and instruments are not good at network segmentation.
  • FDA recently said that the industry is far below standard.
  • The most basic security features are missing in many biotech areas.
    • No network whitelisting.
    • Running Windows XP.
  • Gaining network access to medical devices is an excellent way of escalating level of access across the network.
  • If you can gain control of one hospital in a network of 75 means you have a greater chance of gaining access to the other 74.
  • If you change how you practice medicine every 18 months, people are going to die. The practice can't keep up with the development of enterprise and personal computing advancements.
  • Data security is the best growth area in healthcare IT.
Sep 21, 2016

Maggie Georgopoulos is the Leading Global authority on career development for women in male dominated industries. She is the author of the upcoming book, Up the Ladder in a Skirt, which is hailed as the book for women in challenging roles globally.
A mechanical engineer who climbed to the top of the leadership ladder, Maggie was the executive chairman of a large agricultural company, responsible for the 75% increase in the retention of staff through career development pathways, by the age of 32.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/maggie-georgopoulos-leadership/

Key Takeaways

  • Bad managers turn into bullies when they feel their job is threatened that an employee is after his job.
  • Managers do the day-to-day tasks. Leaders step out and think about how to help the team accomplish the goals.
  • Be open and watch how your interactions affect those around you.
    • Are you too busy to look to see how people react?
    • Are people pretending this is ok or are they genuinely fine?
  • How do you come across to people when you are busy and stressed?
    • Set office hours for visiting.
    • Let everyone know when there is a good time to follow up.
  • Follow through on your actions and promises.
  • When you are task-oriented, people can take that as unfriendly.
  • When people realize it is okay to talk then they became more open and honest.
  • People feet satisfied when leaders show they actually care.
  • Your mental health and the mental health of others is the most important thing in the office. Be aware.
Sep 20, 2016

Alex Barker is a coach for high achievers and mastermind creator for entrepreneurs. He’s a big action taker, just like his clients. He built 3 businesses in 3 years, paid off his house in less 3 years, and has coached over 50 people to build lifestyle businesses. He podcasts on the 66 Day Experiment, where he experiments on his life and business, like creating a business in 66 days, reading a book a day, and facing daily rejection. His mission is to help men and women find a disciplined approach to success in life and business.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/alex-barker-productivity/

Key Takeaways

  • Are you being productive or just working hard?
  • Ask yourself, "What am I doing and how can I change?"
  • Change your morning habits to build a new routine that enhances productivity.
  • Slay your dragons in the morning. Focus on the hardest things that you tend to procrastinate.
  • Decision fatigue affects your ability to make decisions throughout the day.
  • Capitalize on the compound effect of taking daily action. Over time it will yield big results.
  • All it takes is one big client to enable your business to be successful.
  • Accept who you are and capitalize on your strengths.
  • If you take action on the first day of a new opportunity, you will be much further ahead than if you hadn't.
  • When you have success, people want to know how you got successful. You now have an opportunity to start coaching.
  • There is a difference between a coach and a consultant - consultant gives you the information and a coach provides support.
  • Everyone believes what they are missing is the knowledge to do something. The thing that is stopping them is their own doubts.
  • People are afraid of others judging them. For example, they are afraid of selling their product or service because people will think you're just trying to rip them off.
  • The most important aspect of creating productivity is self-discipline, not time management.
  • You need both faith and belief.
Sep 19, 2016

Jason Burt owns Evolve Holdings LLC and has over 20 years of leadership and cultural change experience based on learnings from working with Toyota (TPS/Lean).  Jason has worked in many industries and has been able to use his learning to help guide many companies to increased profitability through implementation of the Toyota philosophies.  Jason has worked in hundreds of companies and industries ranging from Aerospace (Metal Fabricators) to Commercial Farming (Farm & Distribution).

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/jason-burt-motivation/

Key Takeaways

  • Breaking up with a business partner is a lot like breaking up with a spouse.
    • The emotions are high, the assets get split and you need to talk to a lawyer.
    • You need to make a decision on what to do next. Do you carry on with the business, start it over or get a job somewhere else?
  • If you decide to move forward with the current business, you need to re-evaluate the priorities.
    • Reach out to existing clients and let them know what is going on. Take care of their needs.
    • Start hustling for new clients and ensure the revenue can quickly grow back to a sustainable level.
  • Even if selling is not comfortable for you, you can accomplish anything when you are backed into a corner.
  • Once you are taking action and being productive then you'll be more able to calm down and adjust to the new conditions.
  • The greatest demotivator to employees inside a struggling company is not knowing what is happening and how it will affect their jobs.
  • Be true to yourself.

 

 

Resources Mentioned

Sponsors

Sep 18, 2016

Building a D&D campaign is a lot like writing a series of books. First you have to start with the overall series goals before you dive into the details. In this episode we come up with a new campaign story that will play out like a 5 act play or 5 book series.

This is Part 4 of a multi-part podcast series.

Part 1: 10 Business Lessons Learned in Roleplaying Games

Part 2: Interview Players for Your D&D Campaign by Playing Board Games

Part 3: Picking a Genre and System for your RPG

This episode show notes: http://hellotechpros.com/dnd-campaign-design-unplugged/

Key Takeaways

  • Feel free to steal ideas
  • Snowflake method
  • Campaign Hook, one sentence
    • elevator pitch to sell players
    • location, goal, obstacles
    • "Several primitive and diverse tribes have assembled their leaders and heros to determine how to pacify the primordial spirits which have been devastating the area."
  • Campaign Hook, one paragraph
    • "Across the all lands where the springs and tributaries feed into the mighty Nelgenzes River, the primordial spirits are angry. Earthquakes, blizzards, tornadoes, floods and wildfires which were once rare are now more common and deadlier than ever. Crops have been destroyed, herds of animals scattered and killed and entire communities have been wiped out. The primitive and diverse tribes that populate the region have assembled their tribal elders, warchiefs, shamans and scouts to determine how to pacify the spirits of earth, fire, air and water from their frequent episodes of wanton destruction."
  • Big Picture Summary (secret)
    • Here + There + Resolve
    • Us + Them + Resolve
    • Secret 1 + Secret 2 + Secret 3
    • 4 disasters/dilemas + ending
  • 5 Parts of the overall story.
    • Part 1: The tribes nominate their champions who must figure out how to work together to discover leads, track down information, survive the brutality of elementals and protect their people from nature and each other. Cooperation.
    • Part 2: Resolution to learn about areas beyond Nelgenzes. Is everywhere affected? Can we relocate? Exploration.
    • Part 3: The heroes discover an advanced civilization in a far away land which is very different than Nelgenzes. Rich in magic, manufacturing and longevity, their metropolises are a wonder to behold and feel extremely alien. The people are very homogenous. Reflection and Adaptation.
    • Part 4: We learn that the overuse of magic and natural resources to try to control the environment and life expectancy of this civilization has created an imbalance in nature which is resulting in the devastation in the Nelgenzes Valley.
    • Part 5: The heroes must decide on a course of action. Should they destroy or limit magic which will adversly affect the metropolis? Should they migrate and integrate their tribes into this society and learn to master the magical arts? Is there another way to restore the natural order? Resolution.

Resources Mentioned

 

Sponsors

Sep 17, 2016

Simona Pop is a shareholder and head of partnerships & communication for a SaaS startup, InstaSupply. The company operates in the finance and procurement areas of B2B with the focus of changing the way we work through digitization and the removal of redundant manual processes. Simona's goal is to bring B2B in line with B2C across technology and communication. Way too many people go to work and have to leave the efficiencies they know and love in their personal lives at the office door. It's currently like 1999 but without Prince or a party!

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/simona-pop-entrepreneurship/

Key Takeaways

  • Why are we leading dual lives of super techies in personal life and then vintage tech at work?
  • The core idea of entrepreneurship is "Let's make things better."
  • To remain competitve, businesses need to adapt.
    • There is no way to maintain the King of the Jungle status without changing.
  • Enterprise software feels like something frozen in time. The user experiences are not keeping up with what consumers demand.
    • Implementing new technology in the past was more of a Frankenstein effort of independent solutions and not a holistic solution where everything communicates together.
    • Users are logging in and out of 10 different solutions for 8 different tasks.
    • Administrators are spending all day Monday through Wednesday just doing the repetitive tasks.
  • Finance and operations are slow to change processes.
  • Millennials in the workplace accelerates the adoption of modern technology.
  • We need to have a transition tech in the workplace to bridge the gap between millennials and the X Gen and Baby Boomers.
  • We still have a great abundance of paper and spend time, money and resources driving trucks around delivering paper.
  • The network effect of Purchase to Pay is bringing together buyers and suppliers.
  • Think about working smarter and how that will affect your future plans.
Sep 16, 2016

Andy Haskell is a web software engineer at Meta Search in Cambridge, which is like a Google search for your files. Andy also runs the blog Computer Science for the Slothful and is one of the organizers of Boston Golang. When he's not coding, you can find Andy running or gaming. Don't ask Andy Haskell about sloths or Pokemon unless you want to have a 45-minute conversation!

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/andy-haskell-people/

Key Takeaways

  • It's hard to get a job without work experience and to get work experience without a job.
  • Volunteer and look for internships.
  • Are you using the same college exam questions for your interview questions or are you digging deeper?
  • The interviewee should be doing interview themselves. The company is looking for the perfect candidate and the candidate is looking for the perfect company.
  • Show personality and thought process in the interview.
Sep 15, 2016

Stephen Gatchell is currently a Chief Data Officer Engineering Analytics & Data Lake at EMC and serves on the EMC Data Governance Office, Master Data Management and Business Data Lake Operating committee’s developing EMC’s corporate strategies for the Business Data Lake, Advanced Analytics and Information Asset Management.  Stephen also serves as a Customer Insight Analyst for the Chief Technology Office analyzing customer technology challenges and requirements.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/stephen-gatchell-technology/

Key Takeaways

  • A data lake is a way to democratize data. It can be structure, unstructured or semi-structured including all of the data assets including visualizations, tables and views.
  • The idea of a data lake is to break down the silos between the departments and come up with innovative solutions across a variety of different sources. The use cases are very important.
  • Historically, "big data" was 1 GB and all of it was managed by IT.
    • The data would be imported into a BI system in order to analyze.
    • There was no drill down into the raw data from a report.
  • Today data analysts are at all levels of the organization in all departments.
    • HR, legal, engineering, interns and VPs are all analysts.
    • Now we need real-time data with access across the organization.
    • The people, process and technology have all progressed over the last few decades.
      • People who want to drill down to get to the results.
      • Process to get the analytics updated in real time.
      • Open source technology allows anyone to build their own database.
  • A data scientist is a subject matter expert (SME) that understands the data and also can code.
    • They don't need to have a mathematical background but they are studying statistics and want to generate a D3 visualization.
  • Rogue IT is a good thing (as long as they aren't a security risk). We want the business to understand technology.
  • IT needs to keep the lights on and support the business in finding new tech.
    • IT needs to look for end-to-end solutions that help many groups across the org.
    • Data lake, visualization, ingestion tools for example.
  • The next things in Big Data are data governance, MDM and data quality.
    • What is the value of this data to our business?
    • Natural Language Query (NLQ) will enable a no-UI analytics engine.
    • Flash storage will allow petabytes to be searched very quickly.
  • Always learn, build connections and be as persistent as possible.
Sep 14, 2016

Eric Fisher is the .NET Content Author for Code School. He also has over 10 years of experience as a software developer.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/eric-fisher-leadership/

Key Takeaways

  • Are you recognizing the extra effort and overtime that your salaried employees are putting in, or are you just docking them for taking time off?
  • From a Total Cost of Ownership perspective, it's important to track time on projects and support, but not to belittle good employees.
  • Problem solvers and digital workers tend to put in extra work when they are "in the zone." It doesn't make sense to start something deep and involved when there is only 15 minutes left in the day.
  • The team members who speak up and challenge the status quo tend to grow into the spokesperson or team lead for the group.
  • Some companies make you feel like your individual voice doesn't matter.
  • Soft deadlines can be moved, hard deadlines have dire consequenses. Be upfront and communicate the expectations clearly to everyone involved.
  • If you need more people, resource or time, find more people, resource or time. Don't put your employees under undue stress for no reason.
  • Some people do not like conflict and find it difficult to speak up for themselves. We have to look out for everyone, not just those who are more vocal.
  • To get a group to buy into a new idea, discuss it with individuals one-on-one before the group meeting. Get their ideas and concerns out in the open in a non-threatening environment.
  • Bring up your concerns and escalate appropriately with upper management.
  • The employees are going to treat the company the same way the company treats the employees.
Sep 13, 2016

Jay Miller is a System Administrator, Pastor, Developer, and Podcaster.  Jay started the Productivity in Tech Community hoping to help people in the tech industry find ways to be more productive. He's also host the Productivity in Tech Podcast.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/jay-miller-productivity/

Key Takeaways

  • In the military and some large command-and-control companies, you're just supposed to do what you're told.
    • In small business, you don't know exactly what you're supposed to be doing and how to prioritize.
  • Prioritize your day using the Eisenhower matrix.
    • Is this going to break today? (Urgency)
    • Is this going to break soon and get me fired? (Importance)
    • Instead of working on all the little unimportant / non-urgent things and not get anything done, get prioritized.
  • Not everyone's priorities are in alignment.
    • Their fire may be like a struck match and yours is like a building on fire.
    • Have a conversation about the combined priorities and let everyone know what they are.
  • Your heath, personal goals and dreams are never someone else's priority. You need to focus on prioritize time for yourself.
  • A good system is something you don't have to worry about. It just works.
  • If you yes to everyone and everything, you're not allowing people to develop their own productivity systems.
  • Delegate repetitive tasks and focus on higher-level priorities.
  • Get in the zone and enjoy what you're doing.
  • Make sure you're focusing on being productive, not being busy.
  • Focus on the one thing that is the most important today. Don't spend too much time worrying about the future.
  • You are already productive, now start optimizing.
Sep 12, 2016

Andreas Jones is the Founder of Combat Business Coaching, #1 Bestselling author of Business Leader Combat, marketing strategist, business growth expert,contributor at The Huffington Post and army combat veteran. Andreas works with small and medium-sized companies and help them build meaningful businesses so that they can have more profit, fans and freedom.

Who notes at http://hellotechpros.com/andreas-jones-motivation/

Key Takeaways

  • You can't do anything meaningful all by yourself. Put a team in place.
  • When you aren't seeing results, it's easy to beating up and questioning yourself.
  • Search for the perfect mentor who can help you through the difficulties.
  • Success is not convenient and opportunity knocks at inopportune times.
  • Don't use unfortunate situations as an excuse to limit your dreams.
  • If you say yes to your dreams, you have to say yes 1000 times. The first yes is the first step.
  • When you're struggling with imposter syndrome, push through the mental struggles every day.
  • Speed to market is critical.
  • Understand what your clients are looking for and streamline your services to meet their needs.

 

Resources Mentioned

 

Sep 11, 2016

After finding the right group of friends to play a role playing game, it's time to select the genre and system. So. Many. Options.

This is part 3 of a multi-part series.

Part 1
Part 2

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/rpg-genre-system-unplugged/

RPG Genres

  • High fantasy - lots of magic.
  • Low fantasy - little to low magic.
  • Modern action / adventure.
  • Historical action.
  • Horror.
  • Sci-Fi.
  • Super Heros.

 

Resources Mentioned

Sep 10, 2016

Dave Chesson is the author behind Kindlepreneur.com, a site devoted to teaching authors advanced books sales tactics and strategies. Dave's helped authors all over the world increase their sales and does it freely.  Just recently him and his team created KDP Rocket, a software that gives authors key marketing data to ensure their book will succeed on Amazon before they even write it.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/dave-chesson-entrepreneurship/

Key Takeaways

  • You don't have to be a naturally good writer to write and sell books.
  • Fail forward. It's the challenge and overcoming the failure that's fun.
  • Niche websites are doing well at 10k hits a month.
  • Amazon is a search engine.
    • Keyword research and SEO is equally important in Amazon as it is for Google.
    • You need to prove to Amazon that you will make them more money than your competitors.
    • Amazon rankings are influenced by traffic volume, number of purchases and great reviews.
  • Do the research and see if your book going to be successful before you write it.
    • Type in your idea, search and look for books to show up. Are they selling? Are there reviews?
    • If no one is buying, you may not want to get into that market.
    • Amazon Best Seller Rank ranges from 1 to 4.7 million. Type this number into the Amazon Sales Rank Calculator tells you how sales are being generated.
  • Can you beat the competition on the market?
    • Your competitive advantage may be  a better book cover, a more engaging title or better SEO.
  • Develop a skill. Having one thing you're an expert at is more effective than being a jack of all trades.
Sep 9, 2016
Alysse Metzler’s career evolved to not only finding the best talent in the industry but also helping America get back to work. Her life’s mission is to help people of all ages and backgrounds find their dream job. She’s taken all of the lessons she’s learned in her 12 years of recruiting and wrote, The Recruiting Snitch, Recruiting Secrets to Help Land Your Dream Job. Alysse believes by understanding what a recruiter thinks, an applicant can achieve better results from their interviews and their job search.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/alysse-metzler-people/

Key Takeaways

  • While most people are in their current job, they don't think about brand or networking.
  • When you're working, that's the best time to make connections and get to know people when you don't need but but genuinely want to get to know them.
  • You have to know people to find the positions that aren't publically posted.
  • Being shy is not an excuse, you are losing a lot of opportunities.
  • There is no such thing as a permanent job. Every company in every industry has some level of volatility.
  • Keep your LinkedIn profile updated at least yearly.
  • It's not about "collecting" people into your social network, it's about connecting with them as people.
  • At a networking event, try to make one solid new relationship.
  • People want to know "how can this person help me?"
  • It's not about what people can do for you, it's about what you can do for others.
  • Your personal brand is not just your skill set or your presence on social media. It's about building a reputation and being a subject matter expert. It's how people perceive you.
  • Good candidates are connected. They are looking at new tech, going to meetup groups and being part of the community.
  • There are two kinds of job candidates.
    • Active candidates are actively looking for a job. They need a new job right away and have less negotiating power. The longer you are unemployed, the less negotiating power you have.
    • Passive candidates are happily employed and have a powerful personal brand. Recruiters are knocking at their door and making great offers to entice them.
  • The best time to look for a job is when you have a job.
  •  You should be having career conversations with your manager annually during performance reviews.
    • An engineer generally bumps up in job title every 2 years.
    • The director-to-VP track will be longer, in the timeframe of 5-8 years.
    • Proactively have the conversation with your manager if they aren't bringing it up.
  • Closed mouths dont get fed.
  • Network, network, network. Connect with people and get out of your comfort zone.
Sep 8, 2016

TradeLive, a recently launched Austin-based startup, is a modern business-to-business marketplace for new and used IT gear aimed at eliminating the pitfalls that make other IT exchanges slow, unreliable and restrictive.

General manager Doug Wick is building this company, after having spent 15 years in senior product/business development roles at software startups.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/doug-wick-technology/

Key Takeaways

  • The secondary market for IT gear is starting to mature like the used car market.
  • 15 years ago, your only real solution was to find some guy online and sell him a trunk full of stuff. This was ok for small businesses, but not practical for enterprise.
  • In asset disposition, most of it goes to recycling.
  • Cars and computers drop value quickly, though there are still some hardware that is usable and valuable for smaller businesses.
  • Due to Moore's Law, the progress on hardware outpaces the software.
  • The lifetime of hardware is useful for 15 years now.
  • Instead of buying a new router with new options and configurations you can now get the same model off the secondary market.
  • Valuing IT equipment is like valuing art.
  • Tradelive is like CarMax for IT gear.
    • All the inventory is priced at the best price, and is driving the change for the industry.
    • This network of dealerships operates via price transparency and market efficiency.
  • We are now in a position to allow developing countries have access to this equipment.
  • The secondary IT market has been valued in $100s billions.
  • The Austin tech scene works on non-sexy problems.
Sep 7, 2016

Patrick Kua is a Technical Principal Consultant for ThoughtWorks in London. He is a conference speaker and author of "The Retrospective Handbook" and "Talking with Tech Leads" and is passionate about bringing a balanced focus on people, organization and technology.

Show notes at http://hellotechpros.com/patrick-kua-leadership/

Key Takeaways

  • Horrible bosses don't have to be managers, they can be more senior people on the team.
  • Personal issues should be taken offline, after calming down.
  • If you are a junior colleague trying to resolve an issue with a more senior colleague, find another senior individual to act as a mediator.
  • Developer to tech lead is a huge jump and changes the expectations.
    • When you are a dev your workload consists of code, working with fellow devs and solving tech problems.
    • When you are a team lead your workload consists of people issues, planning and whole system architecture.
  • When moving to a tech lead role, it can feel lonely.
    • Your focus is on the broader view, not tech issues.
    • You're not working on the same issues with your old friends.
    • You're starting to spend more time in meetings with people outside the department.
  • However, you have a broader impact on the organization.
    • You set the culture.
    • Instead of having really deep relationships with a small group of people that you pair with every day, you need to invest time with the broader team.
    • You must get outside of your comfort zone and spend time with people with different styles.
  • Your emotional range and capacity to connect with people will grow as your career grows.
Sep 6, 2016

Spencer Liu comes with a 20-year track record in marketing, Internet product strategy, and business development. He's worked with companies such as Sony Computer Entertainment, EA Sports, Sega, and CNET Networks before becoming a serial entrepreneur. He was a founding member of HighGear Media (acquired by Internet Brands, a network of lifestyle-focused car shopping websites) and founded his own consulting company GoSunday later working with many European startups such as Experteer, Qype, and GOOM Radio to fine tune their product strategies and optimizing user experiences.

In late 2011, Spencer positioned himself in the middle of the China mobile gaming industry and was a founding member of Yodo1 Games, a mobile games publishing platform focusing on bringing great western content into the difficult-to-figure-out China gaming market. While solving different business problems which mobile developers and publishers face everyday, Spencer was inspired to simultaneously kick off KTplay, the world’s only in-game player community and live ops platform.

Show notes at 

Key Takeaways

  • Try new things you don't know anything about. Putting yourself outside of your comfort zone makes you work harder to be productive.
  • In uncomfortable situations you have to rely on others and build teams.
  • In some cultures, the big boss is the big boss. The boss never asks, just commands.
  • Take the team out to lunch and establish rapport and promise them they won't get fired for speaking up.
  • People can get unmotivated because they are busy working on 10 things but don't know the priorities.
  • When discouraged, focus outside of yourself.
  • Develop and continually revisit the vision statement. Are yourselves these questions:
    • Who do we want to be and what do we want to do for whom?
    • What was original vision for the company?
    • Are these customers the right partners for the platform?
    • Are we chasing after numbers instead of results?
    • Are the customers using the platform the way we intented them to do?
    • If we continue to duplicate this partnership, what will the product look like 6 month from now?
  • Look at the situation from different perspectives.
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